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MarinTrust has announced that the first production site from the Mauritanian small pelagic fishery has been accepted onto its Improver Programme: Atyfen SARL. Thereby, it becomes the first accepted Fishery Improvement Project (FIP) in Africa under the MarinTrust Improver Programme.

Firstly, the production site that will use the MarinTrust Improver Programme claim must pass a MarinTrust audit. Besides, This FIP is currently led by the industry in collaboration with other local stakeholders. Afterward, the site should comply with the MarinTrust audit requirements annually. The FIP they are sourcing from must also demonstrate continual improvements in line with their Fishery Action Plan (FAP). 

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In more detail, the Programme follows some criteria and scoring systems in line with the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries. For example, check the stock status, resource management strategy, and control and monitoring at sea and unloading points. Further, it keeps an eye on the impact on protected species. Also, on the environment and governance that meets the needs of the fishery and allows all industry stakeholders to participate.

Finally, the Impacts manager at MarinTrust, Nicola Clark explained: “Effective fishery management is key to improving fish stock status. As we are celebrating Oceans Day, it is important to underscore the value of oceans for the life of more than 3 billion people across the globe. This year’s theme Revitalization: Collective Action for the Ocean is particularly relevant. Instrumental as it is to shape multistakeholder coalitions and take decisive steps, collectively, towards responsibly sourced raw materials.”

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